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C++ Switch Statement Tutorials


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Intro to Intel Assembly Language: Part 5
Intro to Intel Assembly Language: Part 5
Last time I taught you how to make conditional jumps and create if-else and switch statements, as well as all kinds of loops. Today we're going to learn how to call functions and basic methods for passing arguments to these functions. Passing arguments to variadic functions and returning values from a function will be left for the next tutorial.
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The SWITCH Statement In C#
The SWITCH Statement In C#
The switch statement offers the programmer the capability to choose a specific block of code from a set of mutually exclusive ones. It is similar but not identical to the if statement. The block of code that will be chosen is not known before the execution of the program. This can be for example due to different windows platform or specific localization settings of each country.
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 The IF Statement In C#
The IF Statement In C#
The if statement is a so-called conditional statement. It allows you to branch your code depending on whether certain conditions are met or not. C# has two such conditional statements, the if statement and the switch statement. In this tutorial we will talk about the if statement, a frequent element of all programs.
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Break statement - C++
Break statement - C++
The break statement has two uses. You can use it to terminate a case in the switch statement.
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The switch statement - C++
The switch statement - C++
C++ has a built-in multiple branch selection statement, called switch which successively tests the value of an expression against a list of integer or character constants.
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