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How to Shoot Dramatic Portraits in Dark Locations
How to Shoot Dramatic Portraits in Dark Locations
The advantage of using a really deep parabolic umbrella in a shoot like this is that it’s, well, deep. That means you can really focus the light on your subject without spilling any of it on to the background. In this case the background had a lot of distracting elements, such as paint shifts, banners, and items that really did not add anything to the images.
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These Incredible Photos of Snowflakes Were Made With a Smartphone
These Incredible Photos of Snowflakes Were Made With a Smartphone
The fun part is that snowflakes come in different sizes and shapes, depending on the particle they formed on, as well as the temperature, wind, humidity, and several other factors. And since the photos are made on glass, you can control the background. It’s not difficult to create lots of unique images in one session.
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How to Modify a One Light Portrait Setup to Get the Look You Want
How to Modify a One Light Portrait Setup to Get the Look You Want
For this set of portraits, Grimes placed a 36″ Rapid Box softbox over the camera and used a reflector to bounce some light back up under the model’s chin. Grimes likes using a light gray background, so he puts his subject close to the background—but not too close. Keep in mind that this exact setup can work for low key portraiture.
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Behind the Scenes of a New Zealand Timelapse
Behind the Scenes of a New Zealand Timelapse
I asked Williams if he could share a few details about his process for PictureCorrect readers, and he kindly provided lots of background information for aspiring timelapse photographers.
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How to Use Strip Softboxes for Dramatic Portraits
How to Use Strip Softboxes for Dramatic Portraits
In going for a darker, low-pass portrait, Belluso needed to isolate his subject from the rest of the hangar, while still providing the highlights he needed to accent the glider in the background. In effect, he needed quite a bit of control over the intensity and directionality of his light. With the the Dou Discus gilder, this was done by hoisting the wing strip lights far above the wings and aligning them with the contours.
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Sports Photographer Shows How He Shot a World Record Breaking Mountain Bike Backflip
Sports Photographer Shows How He Shot a World Record Breaking Mountain Bike Backflip
The first D4S was set up with a remote with the wide angle lens ensuring Wilhelm was able to capture the shot when Zink was in to his backflip. The wide angle also allowed him to capture the mountains and the crowd in the background. The second purpose of this camera was to capture the sequence shots.
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Photographing Ice Climbers in the Arctic Circle
Photographing Ice Climbers in the Arctic Circle
After wanting to photograph ice climbers doing their thing set amidst an aurora borealis background for many years, Ray Demski knew that 2014 was the year to take on the challenge. Thanks to a peaking solar cycle, the winter of 2014 promised to be one of the best times to view the aurora.
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Stunt Photography Techniques On Location
Stunt Photography Techniques On Location
The last shot in the video is a testimony to the fact that even with the best of equipment there is still no alternative to a bit of ingenuity. The lack of room on the old street meant the crew had to strip down the lights, expose them bare-bulb, and hide them just out of sight. The result is a beautiful light that isolated the biker against the background lit by ambient light.
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Tutorial: How to Photograph a Splashing Wine Glass
Tutorial: How to Photograph a Splashing Wine Glass
he background Sharboneau uses is black but for the purpose of these photos, he wants to make it blue. To do so, he uses the second Einstein E640 strobe aimed at the background and places two blue gels over it. The AC3 Zone Controller allows him to control both strobes independently.
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How to Remove Color Casts in Photoshop
How to Remove Color Casts in Photoshop
If you’re shooting with soft lighting and a colorful backdrop, it’s all too common to find a bit of color affecting the subject—green backgrounds make them look sickly, orange makes them glow, stuff like that. In this tutorial, Michael Woloszynowicz shows off a handy little tip that avoids Photoshop‘s messy trial-and-error color balance correction.
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Add Creativity to Your Portraits With a Tilt Shift Lens
Add Creativity to Your Portraits With a Tilt Shift Lens
Having complete control over the areas that are in focus is especially useful for environmental portraits in which certain background elements need to be out of focus to prevent distraction from the subject. In this case, the photographer was trying to blur out the busy store in the background so the eye is drawn instantly to the man in the image.
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Panning Photography: How to Blur the Background without Blurring the Subject
Panning Photography: How to Blur the Background without Blurring the Subject
The best motion photographs pulse with energy. Action photographers accomplish this using many different techniques. One technique employs lightning fast shutter speeds to freeze motion so that every feather of a bird’s wings is perfectly sharp as the bird twists in flight, or so that every droplet of water sprayed by a swimmer is crisp and visible to the viewer.
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Understand Lens Compression in Less Than 3 Minutes
Understand Lens Compression in Less Than 3 Minutes
Lens compression is a bit of a misnomer. It doesn’t compress anything, really—rather, it’s a type of lens distortion, like a fisheye or wide-angle lens. It affects how close or far backgrounds look in an image, even if the subject is in exactly the same spot.
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Interesting Photo of the Day: Sci-Fi Landscape
Interesting Photo of the Day: Sci-Fi Landscape
It must have been a crisp night, because the ghostly green of the aurora borealis is lively in the background. Vetter calls this shot “Night on a Spooky Planet”, and he has expertly captured the essence of a truly foreign land with a long exposure, complete with hints of a green reflection in the water itself.
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How a Photographer Makes an Exploded View of a Car
How a Photographer Makes an Exploded View of a Car
Using the sketch, he photographed each piece of the car in the predetermined position, utilizing a white background and white boxes to set the correct perspective. He repeated this process for each miniature component of the model car, meticulously positioning each piece and photographing it.
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