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Photography Glare Tutorials


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Barbershops: Through the Viewfinder of a Hasselblad
Barbershops: Through the Viewfinder of a Hasselblad
Pendle has always had a love for Hasselblads, but when he first started experimenting with TTV (through the viewfinder) photography years ago, he used a vintage Kodak Brownie reflex camera. He thought of filming the process then, but he always had trouble with glare and reflections in the viewfinder. It would be another five years before he found a solution.
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How to Handle Catch Lights and Eyeglasses Glare in Portrait Photography
How to Handle Catch Lights and Eyeglasses Glare in Portrait Photography
Let`s talk about catch lights and how to handle the glare you get from a clients eyeglasses, and how to add life to dull eyes.
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How to Photograph a Gold Watch
How to Photograph a Gold Watch
It sounds like such a basic task: photograph a gold watch. But if it sounds simple to you, then you’ve never done it the way Phillip McCordall does. Light can reflect off the gold, creating glares, flares, and major wash-outs of detail. So, how do you expose for a still life that’s throwing your studio light right back at the camera lens? You work with the reflection by controlling it:
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How to Handle Catch Lights and Eyeglasses Glare in Portrait Photography
How to Handle Catch Lights and Eyeglasses Glare in Portrait Photography
I’ve previously discussed the importance of catch lights. Without them, your subject’s eyes look dull and lifeless. They help add interest to portraits and are a very effective way to add depth to the eye.
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Beach Photography Tips
Beach Photography Tips
In beach photography, light is not always your best friend. We are accustomed to seeing bright sunlight in beach photos. But remember that if there is white sand, it can cause a lot of glare and result in stark high contrast photos that do not capture the feel of the beach.
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How a Polarizer Filter Works
How a Polarizer Filter Works
A polarizing filter on your camera is probably the most important filter you can use. It removes polarized light from the image, thus reducing reflections and glare, while at the same time increasing colour saturation – especially that of a blue sky.
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How To Use Polarising Filters
How To Use Polarising Filters
Polarising filters are great for shooting in direct sunlight as they remove glare from non metallic objects and in turn create more naturally saturated colours. The effect created by a polarising filter is one of the only effects that can't be replicated in post production, and this post teaches you all about how to use it properly.
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Zoo Photography Tips
Zoo Photography Tips
Go early in the morning, this is when the animals are the most active and there are fewer people to have to shoot around. When photographing in glass enclosed exhibits, use your lens hood to reduce any glare. You can use a shallow depth of field to blur any unwanted background and produce a great wildlife photograph.
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Shooting at Night: 4 Photography Scenarios Explained
Shooting at Night: 4 Photography Scenarios Explained
Shooting outside at night is no easy task if you don’t enjoy the unprofessional and merciless glare of a built-in flash. Today we’ll shed some light on the subject and discuss how you should approach venturing into the darkness with your camera loaded and ready to take on the world. We’ll focus on four different styles that you can use as a springboard for your creativity!
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