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If Statement in C and C++ Tutorial - Part Three - C++ tutorial


This C and C++ programming tutorial discusses the If Statement, relational operators, and variables as we work on our simple calculator app.
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A significant advantage of C# when compared to C++ is the memory management capabilities of the C#. The programmer need not worry about memory management; the garbage collector is assigned this operation on the programmerís behalf. You will probably know that value data types are stored on the stack while reference data types are stored on the managed heap. The stack stores data value types that are not members of objects. Also, in C# it is always the case that if variable a goes into scope before variable b, then b will go out of scope first. For example, if you declare some variables in a method, these variables will go out of scope when the method ends. However, it maybe sometimes that you need to keep these variables long after the method/function ended. This happens for all data declared with the new operator, the reference types. All reference types are stored in the managed heap, which is under the control of garbage collector.
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Lesson 17: Pointers in C
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Using vector instead of arrays to prevent most of memory leaks
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Most of beginners define arrays of limited size such as:

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